gravitationalbeauty
spaceplasma:

Aurora on Saturn

Streams of charged particles blasted from the sun collide with Saturn’s magnetic field, creating an aurora on the planet’s south pole. Unlike Earth’s relatively short-lived auroras, Saturn’s can last for days. Scientists combined ultraviolet images of the auroras, taken by Hubble over a period of days, with visible-light images of the ringed planet. The aurora appears blue because of the ultraviolet camera, but a Saturn-based observer would see red light flashes.


Credit: NASA, ESA, J. Clarke (Boston University), and Z. Levay (STScI) + thebigcheese

spaceplasma:

Aurora on Saturn

Streams of charged particles blasted from the sun collide with Saturn’s magnetic field, creating an aurora on the planet’s south pole. Unlike Earth’s relatively short-lived auroras, Saturn’s can last for days. Scientists combined ultraviolet images of the auroras, taken by Hubble over a period of days, with visible-light images of the ringed planet. The aurora appears blue because of the ultraviolet camera, but a Saturn-based observer would see red light flashes.

Credit: NASA, ESA, J. Clarke (Boston University), and Z. Levay (STScI) + thebigcheese

gravitationalbeauty
afro-dominicano:

Hidden Secrets of Majestic Nebula Revealed in New Photo

The most detailed image yet of the well-known Carina nebula has been caught by a European telescope, unveiling previously hidden features of an exquisite star nursery.

The European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) spied the cosmic landscape of gas, dust and young stars in the majestic Carina nebula, which is located about 7,500 light-years away from Earth. The lively star nursery lies deep in the heart of the southern Milky Way, in the constellation of Carina (The Keel).

The dynamic star formation that takes place in the Carina nebula gives astronomers an intriguing laboratory to study the birth and early lives of massive stars.

afro-dominicano:

Hidden Secrets of Majestic Nebula Revealed in New Photo

The most detailed image yet of the well-known Carina nebula has been caught by a European telescope, unveiling previously hidden features of an exquisite star nursery.

The European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) spied the cosmic landscape of gas, dust and young stars in the majestic Carina nebula, which is located about 7,500 light-years away from Earth. The lively star nursery lies deep in the heart of the southern Milky Way, in the constellation of Carina (The Keel).

The dynamic star formation that takes place in the Carina nebula gives astronomers an intriguing laboratory to study the birth and early lives of massive stars.